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A recent bio I shared (Written in the third person so you can copy/paste for your event’s speaker profile).

Somaneh Bouba Diemé (aka Heart of a Giant) comes from Mali and Senegal (Africa). He now lives in Boston with his loving wife, Desirée, and their three children – two of whom are toddler twins.

While he might be 6’8″ in person, his heart tells him that he is 12′ tall. Bouba was born with a heart defect and lived with the risk of sudden cardiac arrest without being aware until the year he turned 26. He survived congestive heart failure and open-heart surgery. He lives with a HeartMate3 LVAD pump implanted inside his heart while he waits for a heart transplant.

Bouba’s professional background is in engineering and social entrepreneurship. So far, he has enjoyed a decade of work with businesses, organizations, and governments to improve people’s lives through science, technology, and innovation, primarily in the energy and telecoms sectors. Here is his LinkedIn profile.

To make his health circumstances more meaningful and impactful, he involves health education and advocacy work for multiple health and wellness organizations. Bouba frequently shares his journey and speaks on topics related to heart health. And he volunteers as a patient counselor hospital and as a patient ambassador for life-savings health technologies such as the LVAD or the ICD.

Bouba believes that experience is the greatest learning tool that we all commonly share. By sharing his journey, he hopes to make his unique circumstances resonate with people — and that through this sharing, he may be able to express his love and gratitude to those who have walked with him in this path.

Bouba is documenting highlights of his experience on his blog – heartofagiant.blog and social media. He recently launched The HeartofaGiant Foundation, HGF, to support heart health, community building, and advanced chronic health therapies and technologies here in the US and back home in Africa. Through the HGF, he seeks to improve the outcomes for patients managing chronic heart disease by aligning and pulling together resources and a culture of care that fosters healthy outcomes.

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